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What Does the Future Look Like for Non-Smokable Cannabis Products?

But today, the story is different as modernized science and technology have made it possible for companies and people to use cannabis in diverse ways without smoking. Food scientists, industry professionals, botanists, and chemists have discovered new ways of extracting CBD and THC from marijuana plants.

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Love Weed But Hate the Munchies? – How to Enjoy Your Cannabis Without the Pizza, Chips, and Twinkies

One of the best ways to “beat the munchies” is to properly plan for the munchies. The biggest issues with the munchies isn’t that you’re hungry but rather that you don’t want to be munching down on sugary caloric filled garbage. Instead, you can prepare for the munchies by getting healthy foods in your fridge – prepared for consumption at a second’s notice.

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How Long Should a Marijuana Tolerance Break Be?

Over time, cannabis consumers develop a weed tolerance, making the effects of marijuana diminished to a certain degree. This happens to just about anyone who consumes frequently enough. As you consume more cannabis, your brain needs more THC to produce the desired effects you seek. This is due to the diminished effects that occur when THC cannabinoids bind with the body’s CB1 receptors.

However, breaks from consuming have been known to reduce one’s tolerance to cannabis by making the receptors sensitive to THC once again. This is called a tolerance break, or a T-Break.

What is a Marijuana Tolerance Break?

A tolerance break refers to taking a set period of time to abstain from marijuana in order to reset the body’s sensitivity to THC and other cannabinoids. It is most often referred to as a T-break, but there are numerous slang terms for the concept, including “drug holiday” (holiday is used here in the British sense of “taking time off”).

What do we mean when we say “tolerance?” Tolerance is how strongly our bodies react to the effects of a given substance. We develop tolerances because human bodies are highly adaptive, and that includes adapting to the things we consume. As we consume cannabis, our bodies adjust to the cannabinoids over time, resulting in less potent effects. How does this happen? Let’s look at the science behind it.

Why Consider a ‘T Break’: How Marijuana Tolerance Works

While we know that our bodies develop tolerance to cannabinoids rather quickly, the scientific community still has a lot to learn about how the process happens. However, there is some information that may help us understand tolerance breaks.

In our brains we have tiny structures called cannabinoid (CB) receptors which receive and uptake cannabinoids to regulate body processes such as pain and hunger. These CB receptors are dispersed throughout the body and brain, and take in the many different types of cannabinoids to help regulate and influence our bodily processes. These include endocannabinoids, which our bodies produce naturally, and phytocannabinoids, which come from plants, and are the type we find on cannabis. Cannabis cannabinoids have nearly identical structures to some of our own natural cannabinoids, and that is why they fit into our brain and affect similar functions. However, this also likely plays into why we easily develop cannabis tolerance.

scan of a brain

The endocannabinoid system is responsible for the reactions created in our bodies when cannabis is consumed. photo credit

Because cannabinoids affect so many of our regular bodily functions, our bodies also have systems in place to mediate their uptake chemically. Regulating CB receptors can mean making the reaction to receptors weaker (known as desensitizing), or physically retracting (internalizing) them so that fewer cannabinoids can attach.

When our bodies intake more cannabinoids than they usually would, these systems leap into action to respond.  Without regulating systems in place, we may never stop being hungry, or might never feel rested. They exist to help us maintain homeostasis.  However, the same systems will react to an abundance of cannabis cannabinoids. The more cannabinoids we throw at them, the more they will respond to mitigate them. With less available receptors and a weaker response, our bodies react less, and the effects of cannabis are reduced. Consequently, we would need to take in more cannabinoids to have the same level of effect that happened when more receptors were available. As a result, our tolerance goes up.

How Long Should a Cannabis Tolerance Break Be?

A self-imposed tolerance break can last as long as you see fit. To determine how long that should be, consider both the amount you consume and your base tolerance level.

Everyone’s interaction with cannabis is unique, and that is because each person has a unique body chemistry. Remember how we discussed CB receptors above? How these receptors perform in each person will differ depending on their genetics and the unique chemical processes that happen within them. This means factors like a person’s levels of neurotransmitters, or the speed and effectiveness of their metabolism. As such, the duration of a tolerance break will need to be tailored to the individual in order to be most effective.

A typical duration for a tolerance break is 2-5 weeks. Casual consumers may see a tolerance reduction in as short as 1-2 weeks. For semi-frequent consumers, 2 or 3 weeks. Regular heavy consumers may need to hold out a month or longer.

Given the variance from person to person, these are soft guidelines. Overall, the more cannabis that you regularly consume, the longer your break will need to be in order to reset or reduce tolerance.

Completely ceasing cannabis consumption may not always be possible; such is the case with many medical cannabis patients who depend on daily cannabis intake to manage their symptoms. Many have found success doing partial breaks, where they scale back their cannabis intake instead of outright stoppage. This won’t be as reliable as a full-fledged break, but should still be able to help mitigate tolerance increase to some degree. Be aware that reducing use, in place of abstaining from it, will likely take longer to have an effect as well.

When a Tolerance Break from Weed is Needed

In general, a tolerance break is needed when a person feels like they are not getting the strength of response that they need or want from cannabis. There is no set limit of intake that determines when a tolerance break is needed. Furthermore, the reasons for needing a break will be highly dependent on the individual and their circumstances.

The LA times put out some good rough tolerance charts and calculations that can offer some insight, but how well they work for you personally is unknown.

Most people take a tolerance break because they find it difficult to achieve the effects they are looking for with a manageable amount of cannabis. For example, if smoking half a joint used to be plenty to catch a buzz for the evening, but they are slowly finding they need the whole joint to get there. Or even two.

An infographic stating cannabis tolerance break duration times: Casual consumers may see a tolerance reduction in as short as 1-2 weeks. For semi-frequent consumers, 2 or 3 weeks. Regular heavy consumers may need to hold out a month or longer.

        Given the variance from person to person, these are soft guidelines.

Even when you get a great deal on it, cannabis costs money. As tolerance increases not only will it require more product for the desired effects, but that will also mean spending more money. Financial reasons are another of the most common reasons that people take tolerance breaks.

Knowing whether or not a tolerance break is needed will depend on what you’re looking to get out of it. Are you looking to get more potent effects from less product? Or simply looking to reduce your consumption. Is there a set amount you’re looking to stay within? How much or how long that you want to reduce your intake of cannabis will mean examining these factors and setting goals.

In other cases, the T-break is thrust upon us. This can be in the case with job applications, parental rights cases, probation terms and several different instances. Obviously, abstaining for these reasons isn’t quite a break to increase tolerance, however, tolerance will be reduced as a side effect of not consuming, so these breaks should be taken into consideration as well whenever consuming cannabis starts again.

Tips for a Successful Marijuana Tolerance Break

Deciding to take a break is one thing, but carrying it out is another. One integral step in a successful tolerance break is determining goals. Ask yourself, what do I want to achieve as a result of the break?

First, be specific. If you want to reduce your intake, set a goal of what amount you want to reduce it to. Vagueness can keep you from accurately assessing your success.

Aim for something like, “it currently takes me two joints to get high, I would like to reduce that to one joint,” or “right now I need 20mg of edibles to have an effect, and I’d like to make that 5mg.” Maybe any reduction counts as success to you, but if that’s the goal, state it.

a couple of joints near an ash tray

The goal for most people choosing to take a tolerance break is to achieve the same high with less cannabis. photo credit

Once you know your goal, set a time table. Mark on a calendar or set a countdown for the last day of your break. Setting a firm date will help to avoid ending your break early, and give you a measurable time table to check in on your results. Otherwise, it can be hard to know what’s working and what’s just a fluke.

Next, think about what physical variables you can control for your break. Many people suggest getting rid of whatever cannabis you may have on hand so that you’re not tempted. Others suggest finding activities to replace your cannabis routines. For example, if you’re used to a daily joint to unwind after the workday, find something to fill that time slot, such as meditation or exercise. Exercise is especially a good option, as it is known to release anandamide, which has a nearly identical chemical structure to THC. 

It can also be helpful to discuss your break with your immediate friends and family, and that goes doubly so for any of them that you may consume with. Letting them know you’re taking a break means they will (ideally) be less inclined to offer or ask you to partake with them, and can be an opportunity for them to help support you in your goal. The idea here is to minimize the opportunities to consume cannabis, in hopes that it will curb overall consumption. Cannabis is often a very social substance, and it can be hard to put a pause on that bond if it’s something you regularly share with others.

Overall, be as mindful as you can of the times and ways you consume cannabis. The more aware you are of your consumption habits, the better you can control them.

Someone on a tolerance break exercising to avoid smoking cannabis

Try to occupy your mind and time with other things, like exercise. photo credit

However, if you’re looking for some less anecdotal advice there are more academic routes available.

One of the most official looks into tolerance breaks comes from Tom Fontana and the University of Vermont’s Center for Health and Wellbeing. Going off the premise that a break should last for at least three weeks, Fontana created a thorough 21-day guide walking abstainers through the process.

Acknowledging that a break is trying on the individual, the guide aims to help people push through the adversity of a cannabis pause so they can re-evaluate themselves. Each week focuses on a theme with daily practices. The first week centers on the physical, ranging from preparation to our routines. The second week delves into the emotional, ranging from withdrawal to a person’s creativity. Lastly, the final week explores spiritual and existential themes, from crediting yourself, not the substance, to what comes after the break is completed.

CBD and Marijuana Tolerance

The rise of CBD in the cannabis community has inevitably found its way into the tolerance break discussion as well. While not a hot topic of discussion in comparison to other subjects with the cannabis community online, some have weighed in on the matter. In most cases, they suggest that CBD is adequate, if not recommended, during a break.

Some point towards science in the plant and our bodies. They point out that CBD lacks the psychoactive effects of THC, noting that CBD does not bind to the same receptors as THC. Not only does that mean CBD won’t get you high, consuming it shouldn’t disrupt the re-sensitizing process undertaken by a tolerance break.

CBD tincture next to a glass of tea

Surprisingly, CBD may actually be beneficial to consume during a tolerance break. photo credit

Others offered similar sentiments in regards to the non-psychoactive benefits of the cannabinoid. In several cases, consumers self-reported feeling calmer, while others say CBD helped when desires to consume THC came on.

While consuming CBD seems to have its supporters, some caution that full-spectrum and distillate products can still contain trace amounts of THC. If a person wants to altogether avoid THC when consuming, they might want to look into an isolate for pure CBD or a distillate that is void of any THC traces.

The Positive Side of High Tolerance

There are certain circumstances that may call for raising one’s tolerance instead of reducing it. Although higher tolerance can suppress the primary effects of cannabis, it can also reduce the side effects of cannabis as well.  Many medical patients who would not otherwise consume cannabis need to do so to treat their symptoms and find that they need to build up some tolerance to overcome side effects such as sleepiness or anxiety.

If this is the case, you can do something like the inverse of a tolerance break in order to acclimate to a desired dosage. Just as you would with a tolerance break, take note of your goals and current consumption, and track your progress at measured intervals. The key difference is that you’ll be gradually upping your dosage to hit the desired amount or effect instead of reducing it. Be aware that your body will take time to adjust, so take into account that you might be more impaired than usual during the adjustment period. Building tolerance should be done in small progressive steps, and should aim to hit the desired goal and go no further, or else you risk diminishing returns for your time spent acclimating.

Conclusion

All in all, finding your ideal tolerance break duration might take a little trial and error to understand your unique body chemistry and how fast it rebounds from high cannabis tolerance. Once you dial it in, however, you should see noticeable results and feel stronger effects from your normal cannabis consumption habits.


How long do you take tolerance breaks for? Do you have any tips or tricks for maximizing results? Share your thoughts and experiences in the comments below.

Photo Credit: Jose Aragones (license)


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A typical duration for a tolerance break is 2-5 weeks. Casual consumers may see a tolerance reduction in as short as 1-2 weeks. For semi-frequent consumers, 2 or 3 weeks. Regular heavy consumers may need to hold out a month or longer. Given the variance from person to person, these are soft guidelines. Overall, the more cannabis that you regularly consume, the longer your break will need to be in order to reset or reduce tolerance.


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In most cases, it is suggested that CBD is adequate, if not recommended, during a break. Some point towards science in the plant and our bodies. They point out that CBD lacks the psychoactive effects of THC, noting that CBD does not bind to the same receptors as THC. Not only does that mean CBD won’t get you high, consuming it shouldn’t disrupt the re-sensitizing process undertaken by a tolerance break.


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Tolerance is how strongly our bodies react to the effects of a given substance. We develop tolerances because human bodies are highly adaptive, and that includes adapting to the things we consume. As we consume cannabis, our bodies adjust to the cannabinoids over time, resulting in less potent effects. When our bodies intake more cannabinoids than they usually would, these systems leap into action to respond. Without regulating systems in place, we may never stop being hungry, or might never feel rested. They exist to help us maintain homeostasis. However, the same systems will react to an abundance of cannabis cannabinoids. The more cannabinoids we throw at them, the more they will respond to mitigate them. With less available receptors and a weaker response, our bodies react less, and the effects of cannabis are reduced. Consequently, we would need to take in more cannabinoids to have the same level of effect that happened when more receptors were available. As a result, our tolerance goes up.


}
}
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Better Than a Dispensary? – Excitement Around Cannabis Consumption Lounges Hits a Fever Pitch Across America

The rate at which American cannabis users took to these cannabis lounges revealed that they had been eagerly awaiting this moment. Now, people do not have to stay in the solitude of their homes to use pot and they don’t have to ponder on “how and where” to use pot socially. These strides may or may have not been made if the pandemic had not occurred. It is hard to deny the role the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown has had on the booming cannabis industry around the world, most importantly in the United States. Lawmakers do not have the best legislation drafted for the cannabis consumption lounges yet, however, they are doing the best they can to come up with reforms that would stabilize the market.

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Cannabis REIT Up 33% in 2021 and Eyeing New High

2021 has been a tough year for U.S. cannabis stocks.

The Advisor Shares US Cannabis ETF (MSOS) is down 20% on the year and 45% from the 52-week high.

However, while most U.S. cannabis stocks have struggled, one industry leader has delivered a market-crushing 33% gain on the year.

This early industry leader just:

  • reported 100% revenue growth in 12 months
  • paid a quarterly dividend of $1.32 per share, up 32% from last year
  • saw shares hit a new all-time high

Innovative Industrial Properties (NYSE: IIPR) is one of the largest companies operating in the cannabis industry with a market value of $6 billion.

Headquartered in San Diego, California, this industry leader specializes in leasing cannabis cultivation facilities to some of the largest cannabis growers in the country, including Cresco Labs (CRLBF), Curaleaf Holdings (CURLF), and Green Thumb Industries (GTBIF). IIPR currently owns and leases 53 properties in 18 states.

Two Key Factors That Make this Company Unique

There are two key factors that distinguish this company from its peers.

#1 – IIPR Is One of the Few Stocks That Trade on the NYSE

Most U.S. cannabis companies are forced to trade on the Canadian Stock Exchange (CSE) because cannabis is still illegal at the federal level in the U.S. This makes it difficult or restrictive for many U.S. investors to buy these shares.

On the contrary, IIPR is allowed to trade on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) because, as a commercial real estate company, it does not sell cannabis.

This is an important distinction and benefit for IIPR. Trading on the NYSE means that millions of investors and powerful fund managers can buy shares and this is one of the biggest reasons there has been so much interest in this stock.

#2 – IIPR is Structured as a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT)

IIPR also has a unique corporate structure. This company is structured as a Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT). REITs are required to pay 90% of their net income as a dividend. This has transformed IIPR into a very solid dividend stock and one of the few dividend stocks in the cannabis sector.

IIPR just raised its quarterly dividend by 7% to $1.50 per share. That gives IIPR a current dividend yield of 2.45%, close to a 100% premium of the S&P 500’s 1.3% dividend yield.

Trading on the NYSE and offering a hefty dividend have been strong catalysts for IIPR’s share price. But shares are also benefiting from impressive revenue growth as IIPR cashes in on the high-growth U.S. cannabis industry. Second-quarter earnings results from mid-August showed huge growth since last year. Here are a few highlights from the press release.

Q2 Earnings Financial Results

  • Generated total revenues of approximately $48.9 million in the quarter, representing a 101% increase from the prior year’s second quarter.
  • Recorded net income attributable to common stockholders of approximately $29.0 million for the quarter, or $1.17 per diluted share, and adjusted funds from operations (AFFO) of approximately $43.0 million, or $1.64 per diluted share (Note: AFFO per diluted share for the period includes the dilutive impact of the assumed full exchange of IIP’s $143.75 million of exchangeable senior notes (the Exchangeable Senior Notes) for shares of common stock).
  • Paid a quarterly dividend of $1.40 per share on July 15, 2021, to common stockholders of record as of June 30, 2021, representing an approximately 32% increase over the second quarter of 2020’s dividend.
  • Obtained an investment-grade rating from a national rating agency and closed on a $300.0 million private placement of 5.50% unsecured senior notes due May 2026 (the Unsecured Senior Notes).

Looking forward, IIPR should continue to grow revenue. The company continues to invest millions to add new cannabis cultivation facilities to its portfolio.

Here are a few deals IIPR announced last quarter.

Investment Activity

  • From April 1, 2021 through today, made five acquisitions for properties located in Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Pennsylvania; and executed three lease amendments to provide additional tenant improvements at properties located in Florida and Pennsylvania.
  • In these transactions, established new tenant relationships with Sozo Companies, Inc. and Temescal Wellness of Massachusetts, LLC, while expanding existing relationships with 4Front Ventures Corp., Green Peak Industries LLC (Skymint), Harvest Health & Recreation Inc., Jushi Holdings Inc., and Parallel.

IIPR Shares are up 84% in 12 Months and 33% in 2021

IIPR shares have been delivering big gains. Shares are up 84% in the last year and 33% in 2021.

12-Month Chart Innovative Industrial Properties (NYSE: IIPR)

Despite those big gains, I still expect more upside.

The relative strength index (RSI) below the chart is signaling that IIPR is far from being overbought. Looking forward, I expect IIPR to breakout and hit a new 52-week in the next few weeks.


About the Author & Cannabis Stock Trades

Michael Vodicka is an equity analyst with more than 20 years of experience trading and investing. His research has been featured in some of the industry’s most respected publications. He has been investing and leading investors in the cannabis sector since 2013.

Michael Vodicka

Mr. Vodicka brings his expertise and guidance to the members of Cannabis Stock Trades.

Join Cannabis Stock Trades for Mr. Vodicka’s exclusive analysis, trade alerts, and model portfolio.

The post Cannabis REIT Up 33% in 2021 and Eyeing New High appeared first on Cannabis Stock Trades.

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7 Strains for your next canna-friendly BBQ, with Chef Matt

There’s nothing like great BBQ so to celebrate one of our favorite cuisines we talked to Award-Winning Executive Chef & BBQ master Chef Matt aka Matthew Stockard about the dos and don’ts of cooking with cannabis, and picked up some recs for strains and products to pair with your next canna-friendly BBQ. 

Chef Matt is not a “cannabis chef.” 

“At the point you call yourself a ‘cannabis chef,’ you don’t have a real resume.” The award-winning chef told Weedmaps, “so I don’t use the term. I tell people I’m a chef that cooks with cannabis.”

And it’s out of respect for the cannabis plant, as well as his own well-earned bona fides, that Chef Matt makes this distinction. It’s a critical mindset to have for someone who incorporates cannabis into their trade with the care and precision that he does. 

“I don’t want to get you high for no reason,” he clarified. “I want to get you high and solve a problem.” 

Born and raised in Long Beach, California, the ACF-certified executive Chef Matthew Stockard started his career in 1998 with his first restaurant in Oklahoma. He then studied the culinary arts and worked around the world, returning to Long Beach to start a BBQ restaurant in 2010. He’s also run several 5-star institutions for the Hyatt Regency, including Japanese, Teppanyaki, Italian, and even its Vegas-style buffet restaurants. 

Today, in addition to catering high-profile dining events and headlining cannabis expo panels (he’ll be headlining the Cannabis Food Expo in San Francisco and Chicago in November), Chef Matt offers cannabis-infused products, virtual classes, and in-person events that encourage cooking enthusiasts to try new things and get comfortable with cannabis-infused ingredients. You’ll also find no shortage of dank BBQ, Cajun, and other sizzling dishes on his Instagram

Chef Matt’s aim is always to inspire and empower communities to make cannabis part of a balanced, wellness-promoting lifestyle. And his approach is decidedly holistic and rooted in a deep, hard-earned knowledge of the cannabis plant. For Chef Matt, the key to infused BBQ, or any other type of cannabis cooking, is knowing which strains offer terpene and effect profiles that not only stimulate appetite and increase energy but target specific ailments and individual needs. 

“If you get high [when you eat my food], that’s great,” he reiterated, “but getting somebody high doesn’t always solve their issues.”

Even among his most loyal high-profile and celebrity clients, it can be a challenge to get people to realize that the effects of a carefully prepared, infused meal will differ significantly from poor experiences they may have had with distillate-infused, high-powered edibles. 

“I hate that we fall under the edible category. I feel that edibles have a bad name,” he said. “Most of my time is convincing people that I’m not gonna get ’em fucked up. You go places, people are scared of edibles. All my time is convincing people I know what the fuck is going into my products. I know exactly how it’s gonna make you feel.” 

He continued, “For instance, Snoop [Dogg], one of my clients, would hire me to do something and he would never eat. I would have to make his stuff separate because he just didn’t like edibles. He didn’t like the way they made him feel.” 

It took Chef Matt a year to convince Snoop to try a cannabis-infused meal, reiterating that he would be able to describe the precise effect of one of his meals. “When Snoop finally tried it, he came back an hour later and said, ‘I feel exactly like how you told me I was gonna feel. I’m not fuckin with nobody else but you.'” 

Many chefs who cook with cannabis make their own infused butters and oils, and, as Chef Matt has observed, don’t pay thorough attention to the chemical makeup of the strain they’re cooking with. 

“A lot of people are guessing … I got a lot more science behind the shit I’m doing than just throwing some random shit in a machine and letting it go. I’m not guessing, and I’m trying to get people to take guessing out of it.” 

Part of that work involves getting other chefs to buy lab-tested, full-spectrum cannabis products from a licensed dispensary to cook with. Chef Matt also continues to develop his own THC, CBD, and hemp-based products that deliver on his standards of specificity and holistic quality. 

“My goal is to take the edible market further than brownies, rice krispy treats, and cookies.” he said. “I’m trying to get the world to understand that you can eat cannabis for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.” 

For the near future, Chef Matt hopes to build a brand of infused cooking products that are available in every state. He’s the type of culinary personality you’d hope to see dominate the cannabis space, fostering greater community-focused education and a deeper communal understanding of the plant at its center.

Chef Matt’s favorite strains for cooking

Chef Matt maintains a close relationship with Jack Herer Brands, sharing a love for the plant and an appreciation for old school genetics with brand founder Dan Herer (son of Jack). 

“I met Dan by chance,” he shared, “and when I found out what he did, I gave him a rundown of all the [Jack Herer] strains and what they do, and he said, ‘finally somebody appreciates everything my Dad did.’ And he gives me access to stuff that a normal person doesn’t ask for, and he feels like I get it.”

Jack Herer

The original Jack Herer strain offers just about everything Chef Matt likes to include in an infused meal, especially when feeding people with ailments that require appetite stimulation. 

I have some cancer patients that just aren’t hungry and need to gain weight. Me just giving ’em something to get them high, yeah it numbs them, but it doesn’t help them get hungry. So I have to find a terpene profile that’s gonna make them hungry so when they eat a little bit, they’re gonna wanna eat again in two hours, and then they’re gonna get higher, then they’re gonna wanna eat again. I have to get their metabolism going. 

Platinum Jack

Platinum Jack is a particularly high-energy strain that stimulates appetite with a combination of physically invigorating effects and terpenes like myrcene and caryophyllene. 

The Platinum Jack has a high energy. Say I have a cancer patient and they’re tired, they don’t really have any energy, they don’t have any appetite. I usually would give them something like the Platinum Jack because it doesn’t make you sleepy or tired. It makes you want to get up and move around, gets your mind going. And when you’re moving around more, that’s kind of creating an appetite for you. 

Jack Skellington

Chef Matt cooks a lot with Jack Skellington, a chill sativa-leaning hybrid rich in myrcene with a relaxing, creative high that’s great for clients who suffer from stress and anxiety.

Say I have somebody that suffers from PTSD or stress. Me giving them what I gave the cancer patient doesn’t help. Each terpene profile has to be catered to that particular ailment. If somebody’s suffering from depression or PTSD, they need one kind of terpene profile. If somebody has back pain, that’s another terpene profile. You have to know your customer or make a variety of profiles so it works for everybody. 

Other strains for your next canna-friendly BBQ

Whether you’re infusing your BBQ with cannabis or pairing it with a smoke, here are some other strains that offer similar terpene and effect profiles to Chef Matt’s favorites. 

Lavender Kush

Lavender Kush is a strain known for appetite stimulation and has relaxing effects for anxiety and stress relief. It’s also rich in the hunger-inducing terpene beta-caryophyllene. “In the evening, you don’t want to smoke something that’s going to turn your creativity on,” said Chef Matt of appetite-inducing nighttime strains. “What you smoke in the morning and what you smoke at night should be two different things.” 

Amnesia Haze 

Amnesia Haze has a THC content around 20% with small amounts of CBD. It’s also rich in the terpenes beta-caryophyllene and linalool, both potential appetite stimulants. It’s also known to deliver the type of energy that gets one properly invigorated for a big meal.

GSC

GSC (formerly known as Girl Scout Cookies) is a high-energy, mood-boosting, and widely available strain containing a wealth of appetite-inducing terpenes. Be forewarned, however, the THC content on this one is usually higher than Chef Matt’s recommended dose.

“When somebody’s trying to relax, I wouldn’t give them anything over 18%,” he told us. “If you’re not terminally sick, you don’t need anything over 20%.” 

Bearing this advice in mind, exercise caution when barbecuing with GSC or smoking it in tandem with a meal, and seek out GSC flower from a brand you trust to deliver terpene-rich bud, with THC content as close as possible to 20% or lower. 

Some of these companies are so focused on THC content that they forget about the terpene profile. I feel like that’s what the youngsters are forgetting about. The old-timers were all about taste and feel.

An afternoon smoke for snacking

Sour Diesel 

We asked Chef Matt if there was ever a case in which he’d recommend something that didn’t induce a strong appetite, at least, not one big enough for putting down a full meal. 

“Say you eat a snack midday. If you smoke before that snack, you don’t want to smoke something that’s gonna make you too hungry.”

Sour Diesel is a great strain to have on hand for a quiet smoke before an afternoon snack. It offers up energizing, mood-boosting effects, and may boost your appetite slightly, but not likely to the extent that you’d want a whole meal. It’s also known for its cerebral energy that helps with finishing the rest of the day strong.

Featured image courtesy of Chef Matt

The post 7 Strains for your next canna-friendly BBQ, with Chef Matt appeared first on Weedmaps News.

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